Computer Skills

Computer Skills

Our Curriculum

Guess what-- we don't need a course to teach computer skills.  We own a computer and if left to themselves this is what my kids would do ALL DAY LONG:

Now you know that we're really a bunch of zombies.  Or at least normal.  

We type up reports in a word processor (together) and research topics as needed.  When they are fluent in their handwriting, I'll allow them to learn to type.  But they're still not getting the password.  Because this is what they would do ALL DAY LONG:

I don't think we would thrive as unschoolers, as much as I'd like to.  We just don't have the self-discipline.

They get too much screen-time as it is.  Hand my two-year-old an iPad, even though we don't own one, and I'll bet he could figure it out and change your password before you know it.  Technology has it's own incentive to be user-friendly; I don't imagine we'll be that far behind if we exercise restraint during our early years when our brains are still adjusting to the physical world.  I think I'd be furious if my kids went to public school and came home with free Chromebooks and a mandate to do all their homework on them.

My high horse doesn't mean I'm against computer literacy.  They ought to know how to navigate (and compete) in the modern world.  We'll likely take computer-based courses at some point.  Maybe their interests will lead them deeper into technology, and I will humbly assist.  They'll learn how to use a search engine, I promise.  Once they've learned moderation and self-control.  Technology is awesome, and useful, and educational, and entertaining, but my generation is a very poor model for how to balance technology with human life.  We're addicted.  The next generation will be smarter.  They'll know when to unplug. 

Well, maybe.